Monday Trivia gets Oscar screen test

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Monday Trivia gets Oscar screen test

Posted on: March 3rd, 2014 by tommyj

Click here to view original web page at www.macon.com

If Sunday night’s Academy Awards didn’t whet your appetite, Monday Morning Trivia has tough questions about local ties to the Oscars.

Lights. Camera. Action.

1. Which of the following is NOT true about Macon-born actor Melvyn Douglas, who won Oscars for “Best Supporting Actor” in “Hud” in 1963 and “Being There” in 1979?

(A) His father was a Russian-born concert pianist and professor of music at Wesleyan College. (B) His wife, the late Helen Gahagan, ran a high-profile campaign against Richard Nixon for the U.S. Senate in California in 1950 and gave Nixon his famous nickname “Tricky Dick.” (C) At the 1903 Georgia State Fair, his baby carriage was covered with morning glories, described as being the “most tastefully decorated” and he was singled out in a newspaper article as “an exceedingly pretty little man.” (D) He played Atticus Finch in “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

2. John Huston and his father, Walter, were the first father and son to be both nominated (1941) and to win (1949) an Academy Award. Which movie did 10-time Oscar nominee John Huston direct in 1979, most of which was filmed in Macon?

(A) “The Great Santini” (B) “Wise Blood” (C) “Norma Rae” (D) “Apocalypse Now”

3. Cordele’s Mac Hyman wrote “No Time for Sergeants,” which was turned into a Broadway play, movie (and TV series) and helped launch the careers of Andy Griffith and Don Knotts. The 1958 movie was directed by two-time Oscar nominee Mervyn LeRoy, who also was nominated for Best Producer of which beloved classic?

(A) “The Wizard of Oz” (B) “Mary Poppins” (C) “It’s a Wonderful Life” (D) “Dumb and Dumber”

4. Which of the following is NOT true about Macon-born actor Charles Coburn, who won Best Supporting Actor for “The More the Merrier” in 1943?

(A) He starred with Marilyn Monroe in “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” and “Monkey Business.” (B) He graduated from Central Georgia Tech. (C) He appeared in “Kings Row” with Ronald Reagan. (D) He was born in Macon in 1877, moved with his family to Savannah when he was 9 months old and claimed his father always told him he born under a rose bush in Macon.

5. The comedy “My Cousin Vinny” included many scenes filmed in Monticello. Which star won an Academy Award in 1993 for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Vinny’s girlfriend, Mona Lisa Vito?

(A) Marisa Tomei (B) Winona Ryder (C) Emma Thompson (D) Demi Moore

6. Macon Telegraph columnist Susan Myrick served as a technical adviser for which classic movie, which won the Academy Award for “Best Picture” in 1939?

(A) “A Star is Born” (B) “Gone With the Wind” (C) “Citizen Kane” (D) “Ben-Hur”

7. Two of Hollywood’s biggest box-office stars appeared in baseball movies filmed in Macon in 2012 and 2013. What are their names?

(A) Brad Pitt and Robert Downey Jr. (B) Bruce Willis and Tom Cruise (C) Tom Hanks and Mel Gibson (D) Clint Eastwood and Harrison Ford

8. Which talk show host, who taped two shows here in 2007, was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in the 1986 movie, “The Color Purple,” written by Eatonton-native Alice Walker?

(A) Sally Jessy Raphael (B) Rosie O’Donnell (C) Ellen DeGeneres (D) Oprah Winfrey

9. Macon-born actress Carrie Preston appeared with Oscar-winner Julia Roberts in which 1997 romantic comedy?

(A) “My Best Friend’s Wedding” (B) “Runaway Bride” (C) “Pretty Woman” (D) “Steel Magnolias”

10. Macon native Luke Askew’s best-known role was in the 1969 film “Easy Rider,” which was nominated for two Academy Awards. Which Paul Newman movie, released two years earlier and also nominated for two Oscars, was Askew’s breakthrough film as a Hollywood actor?

(A) “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” (B) “The Sting.” (C) “Cool Hand Luke.” (D) “The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean.”

BONUS QUESTION: The world premiere of “God is My Co-Pilot,” written by Macon’s Gen. Robert L. Scott, was on April 7, 1945, at the Grand Theatre (now the Grand Opera House). In the movie, actor Raymond Massey appears as Maj. Gen. Claire L. Chennault. Massey was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor five years earlier for his portrayal of which U.S. president?

(A) Franklin D. Roosevelt. (B) Abraham Lincoln. (C) Calvin Coolidge. (D) John Adams.

ANSWERS: (1) D. (2) B. (3) A. (4) B. (5) A. (6) B. (7) D. (8) D. (9) A. (10) C. (Bonus) B.

REPORT CARD: (11) Lifetime Achievement Award. (9-10) Hollywood Walk of Fame. (7-8). Box-Office Sensation. (5-6) Golden Globe Nominee. (3-4) Stale Popcorn. (0-2) Straight to DVD.

Seuss_Animal

PERRY — For Jason Fuchs, the letter “X’’ has marked the spot where he once enjoyed his proverbial 15 minutes of fame.

That fame, however fleeting, still rears its head like a long-necked Xylopotamus at this time every year, like something right out of a Dr. Seuss book.

Jason will reach for the red, three-ring binder that serves as the scrapbook for his magical fifth-grade year of 30 years ago. There are photographs, newspaper clippings and the most prized page of all — a hand-written proclamation from Dr. Seuss himself.

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born on March 2, 1904. The man better known as Dr. Seuss would be 110 years old if he was still alive. He remains one of the most beloved children’s authors and illustrators of all time.

For the past 17 years, his birthday has been celebrated by the National Education Association as part of national “Read Across America Day.’’ It will start on Monday this year, kicking off a week of reading by students, teachers, parents and community volunteers.

A generation has passed since Jason found himself in a parallel universe with the imaginative characters and metrical verse of Dr. Seuss. He is now 41 years old, with children of his own, and teaches sixth-grade science and social studies at Perry Middle School.

In May 1984, he was a fifth-grader at Clough Elementary in Rome, N.Y. His father, Bob, was stationed at Griffiss Air Force Base. (In 1985, the family was transferred to Warner Robins. His mother’s name is Claire, and he has an older brother, Michael.)

A reading class at his school had been assigned to find animals in Dr. Seuss books, starting with each letter of the alphabet. They searched every dog-eared page in the school library for the Horton the Elephants and Yertle the Turtles in the world of Seuss. They came up with something for every letter except “X.’’

Out of curiosity, a secretary at the school wrote Seuss through his publicist to inquire about the “X” exclusion. Much to the surprise and delight of the school, Seuss wrote back, apologizing for what he called an “X-asperating oversight.’’

Jason Fuchs created a creature beginning with "X" for Dr. Seuss as a kid in 1984.

“It’s about time I did something about it, and pretty soon I will,’’ he wrote.

The teachers at Clough decided to hold a contest to challenge the 440 students to use their creativity and come up with their own suggestions.

Jason took out his box of crayons and gave birth to what he called a “Xylopotamus’’ — a hippopotamus with a xylophone on its back. The creature played the xylophone with its tail, and Jason gave it a long neck, like a giraffe, so it could turn its head to watch its own musical performance. It wore a red drum major’s hat. Jason said his musical theme probably was the result of learning to play the trumpet that year.

The school received about 100 entries, and Jason was selected as one of 11 finalists. Among the other animals were a Xaroo, Xaboo and Xerphadorious.

Seuss graciously agreed to judge the finals. Actually, he wrote back and said he had appointed the “Cat in the Hat” to be the official judge. Even his publicist was surprised he consented to judge the competition because of his busy schedule.

Seuss personally declared Jason as the winner with an “Official Proclamation.’’ It was free-handed in ink and crayon with a drawing of the “Cat in the Hat.’’

This is to announce to the City of Rome and the rest of the world that Jason Fuchs is the winner of the Animal X-ing Contest with his most amazing Xylopotamus. Signed, The Cat in the Hat and Dr. Seuss.

He included a separate note, congratulating the students on their “X-traordinary hunt for the X-traordinary X-ample of Dr. Xeuxx fauna.”

The contest brought a measure of notoriety to both Jason and the school. It was written up in local and state newspapers. The Syracuse Post-Standard cleverly reported the story in the form of a Dr. Seuss rhyme.

Jason’s last name, Fuchs, is pronounced “Fox.’’ Or, as the Dr. Seuss book might say, “Fox in Socks.” He is a 1991 graduate of Warner Robins High School, and has been a teacher at Perry Middle School since 1997. He spent a year in Afghanistan in 2002-03 with the Army Reserve, working with special forces.

Over the years, he has joyfully recounted the story to his wife, Beth, and children Spencer, 11, and Addison, 6. Spencer is in the sixth grade, only a year older than Jason was at the time. Addison is a first-grader at Kings Chapel Elementary, and Jason shared his Dr. Seuss story with her kindergarten class last year.

Jason considers “The Lorax” to be his favorite Dr. Seuss book, and he took his family to see the movie. (It was released two years ago today, on March 2, 2012.) As a science teacher, he appreciates the book’s message about taking care of the earth.

His children have grown up in an era of Xboxes and The X-Factor. But they can still appreciate their father’s own version of Generation X.

Dr. Seuss died in 1991 and, to Jason’s knowledge, never included the contributed Xylopotamus in any of his stories.

Jason once thought he spotted it, though. It was on a crowded, busy page filled with zany characters.

“I swear I saw it in the background,” he said, laughing. “I could have been imagining it, though. It might have been wishful thinking.”

Reach Gris at 744-4275 or egrisamore@macon.com

Mr_Ahn

You don’t tug on Superman’s cape.

You don’t spit into the wind.

You don’t pull the mask off that old Lone Ranger.

And you don’t mess around with … Ahn.

Jim Croce wrote that song — I added the Ahn part — two years before Edward Ahn came to the U.S. from Korea and later opened the first martial arts school in Macon.

That was 40 years ago. Grand Master Ahn is now 72. The man still has his moves, though. He has been a ninth degree black belt, the highest rank in the world, since 1994. His teacher almost 60 years ago was Gen. Choi Hong Hi, the modern-day founder of tae kwon do.

There might be bigger, stronger and faster folks than Ahn, but none more disciplined and dedicated to fitness. His body is so fine-tuned you could strike a match on it.

Since 1979, he has run more than 50,000 miles, more than twice the circumference of the Earth. There are so many moving parts to his exercise regimen — he rises at 4 every morning — it would make your head spin. (If only that counted as aerobics.)

He can take down a person with one finger.

Do not, I repeat, do not ask for a demonstration.

He has trained more than 4,000 black belts in Macon and Middle Georgia since introducing tae kwon do here in 1974. A number of them will gather to honor him on Saturday afternoon at Ahn’s Fitness Center on Vineville Avenue.

E.C. Ahn talks about how he came from South Korea to Macon in the 1970s.

The anniversary will be a celebration of Ahn’s endurance and dedication, although certainly not a retirement party, because the master is unstoppable.

Still, there will be deeper meaning upon reflection.

It has been a tough year.

Last June, Ahn was diagnosed with colon cancer. The man who takes so much pride in his diet and health was knocked to the ground. It was in his genes, and no way to deflect it with a forearm or snap kick. His two brothers died of the disease.

It has not been lost on anyone that this amazing man, with all those survival skills, was put to the ultimate survival test.

His friends and family claim he has come back with more zest than ever. On Tuesday, he will teach his first class in nine months. It will come on the March 4 anniversary of his first class in Macon in 1974.

His 40 years are another mile marker on a road well-traveled and a life well-lived. He said he is excited about No. 41, but taking ’em one sunrise at a time.

Of all the times I have been around Grand Master Ahn, my lasting image of his wide-reaching influence on our community came the night of April 17, 2008, when he was inducted in the Macon Sports Hall of Fame. There were more than 400 people in the Monument Room at the Macon Coliseum, and more than one-third of them belonged to his side of the room. They rose to their feet with reverence each time his name was called.

In his acceptance speech, Ahn talked about bringing his wife, Tae — yes, her name really is Tae (meaning kick) — and his two children (Wendy and Johnny) to Macon.

“Tae kwon do has been more than just a business for me,” he said that night. “It has been my life for over 50 years. This is (affirmation) for me that I have chosen the greatest place in the world to live.”

His English is still heavy with the accent of his homeland, although considerably more polished than when he arrived here and could only communicate by pointing to words on a piece of paper.

Until 1945, when he was 4 years old, there was no North and South Korea. With Soviet forces in the north, and American forces in the south, his family fled to Seoul across the 38th parallel.

When he was 12, he began training under Choi Hong Hi, who later hand-picked him to become an instructor in the U.S. At the time, America was experiencing a surge in popularity in the martial arts with the release of five Bruce Lee movies.

In 1960, Ahn became the first person to demonstrate the art of tae kwon do on Korean television. He later trained members of the Korean Army in self defense, then went to Vietnam to instruct the American Green Berets. He came to the U.S. in 1973, first to Los Angeles and then to Chicago to learn from the instructors at the schools there.

He was encouraged to look for a location in the South, either in Georgia or in the Charlotte area of North Carolina. He pulled out a map, and placed his finger on Macon. It was in the center of the state and next to an interstate.

He came not knowing what to expect or that he would be embraced by so many for so long. His first studio was located downtown on Second Street before moving out to midtown in a former car wash and car audio store on Vineville Avenue. His son, Johnny, has followed in his father’s capable footsteps, and has been an instructor for the past 25 years.

When Ahn was so sick last year, the doctors marveled at his comeback and attributed it to his exercise regimen, strict diet and stress-free lifestyle.

He is a disciple of daily exercise — never an excuse for taking a day off. He eats oatmeal every morning and only one other meal, usually a rice dish and Korean cabbage at 4 in the afternoon. Occasionally, he and his family will splurge and drive to Buckner’s Family Restaurant at Exit 201 to chow down on fried chicken and all things Southern.

It’s like a vacation. Live it up. The master deserves it.

Reach Gris at 744-4275 or egrisamore@macon.com.

You don’t tug on Superman’s cape.

You don’t spit into the wind.

You don’t pull the mask off that old Lone Ranger.

And you don’t mess around with … Ahn.

Jim Croce wrote that song — I added the Ahn part — two years before Edward Ahn came to the U.S. from Korea and later opened the first martial arts school in Macon.

That was 40 years ago. Grand Master Ahn is now 72. The man still has his moves, though. He has been a ninth degree black belt, the highest rank in the world, since 1994. His teacher almost 60 years ago was Gen. Choi Hong Hi, the modern-day founder of tae kwon do.

There might be bigger, stronger and faster folks than Ahn, but none more disciplined and dedicated to fitness. His body is so fine-tuned you could strike a match on it.

Since 1979, he has run more than 50,000 miles, more than twice the circumference of the earth. There are so many moving parts to his exercise regimen — he rises at 4 every morning — it would make your head spin. (If only that counted as aerobics.)

He can take down a person with one finger.

Do not, I repeat, do not ask for a demonstration.

He has trained more than 4,000 black belts in Macon and Middle Georgia since introducing tae kwon do here in 1974. A number of them will gather to honor him on Saturday afternoon at Ahn’s Fitness Center on Vineville Avenue.

The anniversary will be a celebration of Ahn’s endurance and dedication, although certainly not a retirement party, because the master is unstoppable.

Still, there will be deeper meaning upon reflection.

It has been a tough year.

Last June, Ahn was diagnosed with colon cancer. The man who takes so much pride in his diet and health was knocked to the ground. It was in his genes, and no way to deflect it with a forearm or snap kick. His two brothers died of the disease.

It has not been lost on anyone that this amazing man, with all those survival skills, was put to the ultimate survival test.

His friends and family claim he has come back with more zest than ever. On Tuesday, he will teach his first class in nine months. It will come on the March 4 anniversary of his first class in Macon in 1974.

His 40 years are another mile marker on a road well-traveled and a life well-lived. He said he is excited about No. 41, but taking ’em one sunrise at a time.

Of all the times I have been around Grand Master Ahn, my lasting image of his wide-reaching influence on our community came the night of April 17, 2008, when he was inducted in the Macon Sports Hall of Fame. There were more than 400 people in the Monument Room at the Macon Coliseum, and more than one-third of them belonged to his side of the room. They rose to their feet with reverence each time his name was called.

In his acceptance speech, Ahn talked about bringing his wife, Tae — yes, her name really is Tae (meaning kick) — and his two children (Wendy and Johnny) to Macon.

“Tae kwon do has been more than just a business for me,” he said that night. “It has been my life for over 50 years. This is (affirmation) for me that I have chosen the greatest place in the world to live.”

His English is still heavy with the accent of his homeland, although considerably more polished than when he arrived here and could only communicate by pointing to words on a piece of paper.

Until 1945, when he was 4 years old, there was no North and South Korea. With Soviet forces in the north, and American forces in the south, his family fled to Seoul across the 38th parallel.

When he was 12, he began training under Choi Hong Hi, who later hand-picked him to become an instructor in the U.S. At the time, America was experiencing a surge in popularity in the martial arts with the release of five Bruce Lee movies.

In 1960, Ahn became the first person to demonstrate the art of tae kwon do on Korean television. He later trained members of the Korean Army in self defense, then went to Vietnam to instruct the American Green Berets. He came to the U.S. in 1973, first to Los Angeles and then to Chicago to learn from the instructors at the schools there.

He was encouraged to look for a location in the South, either in Georgia or in the Charlotte area of North Carolina. He pulled out a map, and placed his finger on Macon. It was in the center of the state and next to an interstate.

He came not knowing what to expect or that he would be embraced by so many for so long. His first studio was located downtown on Second Street before moving out to midtown in a former car wash and car audio store on Vineville Avenue. His son, Johnny, has followed in his father’s capable footsteps, and has been an instructor for the past 25 years.

When Ahn was so sick last year, the doctors marveled at his comeback and attributed it to his exercise regimen, strict diet and stress-free lifestyle.

He is a disciple of daily exercise — never an excuse for taking a day off. He eats oatmeal every morning and only one other meal, usually a rice dish and Korean cabbage at 4 in the afternoon. Occasionally, he and his family will splurge and drive to Buckner’s Family Restaurant at Exit 201 to chow down on fried chicken and all things Southern.

It’s like a vacation. Live it up. The master deserves it.

Reach Gris at 744-4275 or egrisamore@macon.com.

Paul_Beliveau

We grow where we are planted

When Paul Beliveau was transferred to Robins Air Force Base in 1967, his orders had the base located in Macon, the closest metropolitan area.

Paul, a young man of 20, did not bother to look at a map. He went to Macon to look for a place to live. He found an upstairs apartment on Magnolia Street, signed a lease and was ready to report for work.

In the days before GPS, there was GAS. He stopped at a gas station on Broadway to ask for directions.

“How do I get to the base?” he inquired to the fellow at the pumps.

“Over in Warner Robins,’’ said the man.

“You mean it’s not in Macon?” Paul asked.

Paul Beliveau explains how he accidentally moved to Macon as an Airman stationed at Robins AFB.

He was pointed in the direction of Highway 247, then a two-lane road. Paul had a “sinking feeling.’’ He wondered if his logistical mistake had left him with a long, daily commute.

He can now look back with grateful humor on the day he “accidentally moved to Macon.’’
It changed his life.

He fell in love with Macon. And Macon fell in love with him.

One week from today, Paul will be inducted into the Georgia Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame at the University of Georgia, along with veteran Atlanta news anchor John Pruitt and Bill Cathcart, of WTOC in Savannah. They will join an illustrious list of 66 broadcast legends (since 1984), including Tom Brokaw, Larry Munson, Ludlow Porch, Skip Caray and Monica Kaufman Pearson.

Paul has been in broadcasting for more than 50 years. He was a familiar voice over the AM airwaves at Macon’s WNEX, WBML and WMAZ radio.

On Feb. 7, he retired as director of advertising, public relations and broadcast services at the Georgia Farm Bureau, where he served as executive producer and co-host of the weekly nationally televised “The Georgia Farm Monitor.’’

It’s serendipitous that a guy from Rhode Island, who spoke French until he was 5 years old, would one day find himself reporting on peanuts and soy beans in south Georgia.

But we grow where we are planted.

Paul was raised in Woonsocket, R.I., now the corporate headquarters for CVS Pharmacy. His father was a French Canadian, and French was the only language spoken at home until Paul was 5. His mother took him to a nearby Catholic school and asked the nuns to teach him English.

It turned out to be a blessing, since the nuns were from the Midwest. His accent reflected more purity than the distinctive New England dialect that surrounded him.

When he was 10, Paul would ride his bicycle to WNRI to watch the DJs through the window. There was a speaker outside, so he could listen, too.

“If I didn’t come home, my mother would call the station and ask if there was a little boy hanging out by the window,’’ he said.

The station’s employees would sometimes invite him inside. He would practice his “radio voice’’ while reading the UPI wire. By the time he was 15, he was hired for a shift on Sunday mornings. It was mostly pre-recorded, so his on-air experience was limited to announcing the time at the top of every hour.

Eventually, he had his own afternoon show. He received permission to leave school 20 minutes early every day. After graduating from high school, he joined the Air Force and touched down in Macon, albeit 19 miles off target.

He called WNEX one day and informed them that they could “use some help.’’ It got him a job spinning Top 40 records. He once met Little Richard. And he was on the air on the Sunday afternoon of Dec. 10, 1967, when the bell clanged in the wire room. It was a bulletin. Otis Redding had been killed in a plane crash in Wisconsin. Paul announced it on the air. “The phones went crazy,’’ he said. ABC News called him for a comment.

Hear Paul Beliveau interview Bob Hope during Hope’s 1972 visit to Macon.

He left WNEX for a reporter’s job at WBML, where a star-studded news team covered every fender bender and brush fire in the city. The station’s management promised to hold open his job after he was transferred to Puerto Rico.

When he completed his military tour of duty, Paul returned in January 1970. He could have gone anywhere. He chose Macon.

“I felt a connection, a sense of place,’’ he said.

He would later meet and marry his wife, Kay, who worked at Capricorn Records in the early 1970s.
Bill Powell lured him away from WBML with a lucrative offer from WMAZ, where Paul spent 15 years, eventually becoming radio director of news and operations.

He interviewed three Presidents — Carter, Ford and Nixon. He once talked to Bob Hope, who came to Macon for a benefit for the Grand Opera House.

By 1985, Paul said he was “burned out.’’ He was sleeping with a walkie-talkie by his bed. He left for the Georgia Farm Bureau, where he directed corporate media relations, published two statewide magazines (with a combined circulation of 400,000), and managed the bureau’s television and radio operation, web sites and social media.

“The Georgia Farm Monitor” television show is aired on RFD-TV Network (available in 50 million U.S. homes) and a dozen stations in Georgia, including WMAZ-TV. He helped create and manage the Georgia Farm Radio Network, with seven daily programs in 55 radio markets.

Even in retirement, he will stay busy. He may want to write his memoirs, too.

After all, not many folks move somewhere by accident. Paul has not only made a living, but built a life.

Reach Gris at 744-4275 or egrisamore@macon.com

BOLINGBROKE — Harry “Red” Callaway bought a new Toyota last week.

Driving a Japanese car was something he never could have imagined on the morning of Sept. 2, 1945. He was a crew member on the USS Mattaponi of the Pacific Fleet. He was anchored nearby in Tokyo Bay when Japan formally surrendered in a ceremony aboard the USS Missouri, signifying the end of World War II.

This was not the first Toyota that Red has parked in his driveway in downtown Bolingbroke. He has owned one in the past. In fact, he drove his first Japanese vehicle right after the war, almost 70 years ago.

He was part of the initial occupation forces in Japan, assigned to Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the months after the atomic bombs were dropped.

He and a Navy buddy once found an abandoned car that ran on charcoal. They drove it around but didn’t know how to stop it. Luckily, they were able to bail out before the vehicle rolled down a long pier and into the water.

Red will be one of three senior military veterans from Monroe County who will be honored by the Central Georgia Council (Ocmulgee District) of the Boy Scouts at its annual Golden Eagle banquet in Forsyth on Tuesday night.

Karl Cartledge, also a World War II Navy man, and Glover Stuart, who was called to duty with the Army during the Korean War, will be recognized at the dinner in Vinzant Hall on the former campus of Tift College.

Joel Raley, one of the organizers of the event, said a “stellar citizen” is honored each year, but this time the decision was made to salute the three veterans.

“We are losing more of them every year, especially the ones from World War II,” he said.

Karl is 91 years old, Red is 86 and Glover is 85.

Actually, Glover claims to be 21. He and his twin sister, Gladys Rogers, were born on Feb. 29, 1928 — both Leap Year babies whose birthday rolls around only once every four years.

Red has long been one of Bolingbroke’s most colorful citizens, even though the gray has caught up with his red hair. There once was a famous sign on U.S. 41 at the city limits of Bolingbroke that read: “Home of 301 Nice People and One Old Sorehead.”

Folks used to tease him about it, even though he was more redhead than a sorehead. He graduated from Mary Persons High School in 1944 and volunteered for the war “because I was just a wild kid and didn’t know what I was doing.”

After WWII, he returned to his hometown and operated a furniture restoration and refinishing business in Bolingbroke. He never was a Boy Scout himself, but he served as an assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 1 in Macon in the early and mid-1960s.

“I learned more from the Boy Scouts than they ever learned from me,” he said, laughing.

Glover wasn’t a Boy Scout either, although he might have qualified in the true spirit of Scouting. He grew up on a farm near Smarr, where his family members were sharecroppers.

In his youth, Glover probably picked enough cotton to keep all the Scout troops in Georgia in uniform for a year.

“We had to be like good Boy Scouts out there in the country,” he said. “We had to know how to do things like hunt and fish.”

Near the end World War II, when the draft age was raised, Glover just missed the cutoff which might have made him a veteran of two wars. He was later sent to Korea in 1951, where he was wounded twice in combat and hospitalized for 17 months. He received the Purple Heart and Oak Leaf.

He returned to Smarr, married his wife, Evelyn, and worked in the utility business.

He is active at First Baptist Church in Forsyth and is legendary for his beautification efforts along U.S. 41 with wildflowers, buttercups and roses.

Karl has to chuckle when he admits that he never rose above the rank of “tenderfoot” during his Scouting days.

But he more than made up for it with his military service, flying a Navy F6F Hellcat in the Pacific Theater. He participated in air battles at Iwo Jima, Okinawa and Tokyo.

He continued in the family furniture business after the war and married his wife, Lillian. Over the years, he has been applauded for his commitment to community service with The Medical Center of Central Georgia, the Ronald McDonald House, Friends of the Library and Forsyth United Methodist Church. He established a foundation and scholarship fund in his wife’s name after she died in 2004.

Once, while speaking to a group of Monroe County Scouts about his fighter pilot experiences, a young Scout asked him if he had watched the flag being raised at Iwo Jima.

“No,” he said, laughing. “I was kind of busy at the time.”

Reach Gris at 744-4275 or egrisamore@macon.com.

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